Technology to Earn an A+ in Group Study

Hotspots, video conferencing tools and more help peers work together.

By on August 8, 2013

It’s a scenario that can happen to any study group. Plan to meet at a local coffee shop to power through a lengthy physics study guide. The group shows up, grabs a cup of coffee and sits down, armed with a laptop and the goal to make it through finals week.

A member of the study group tries to connect to the Internet, only to realize the shop doesn’t have Wi-Fi. Luckily, a group member pulls out a 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot and connects group members to an Internet connection. For an in-person study session, devices like mobile hotspots make it possible to meet almost anywhere and get work done with a portable Internet connection.

Finding a time to meet with a study group means coordinating many busy schedules, a sometimes daunting task. While the days of meeting with fellow classmates in the school library or coffee shop for study sessions aren’t necessarily gone, technology provides additional options for students who can’t be in the same place at the same time. Now, groups can study and meet through video conferencing tools like Google Hangout, which allows members to meet online from their dorm room or on the go.

After the group has collected notes and information on the selected topic, it’s time to pull together one final document. Google Docs enables the group to collectively work in one document, spreadsheet or slide show simultaneously from any desktop, laptop or mobile device with Internet access. This tool can also be helpful during the final editing process as group members can track changes made to the document. 

Verizon Cloud’s secure storage, available on smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktops, enables users to sync and save important photos, videos, contacts, music, call logs and text messages. Verizon Cloud ensures that the final presentation isn’t lost if a tablet or smartphone is left in a teammate’s car after practice. By simply logging into a Cloud account from the classroom’s desktop, the user can pull up the project, even without his or her tablet.

Students arming themselves with these tools are sure to earn an A+ in tech-savvy group work.