Technology Bridging the Distance

Military families and friends use their devices to connect.

By Chuck Hamby on November 11, 2013

Sarah Kruck and her husband, Capt. Jason Kruck, were recently relocated to Fort Carson in Colorado Springs, Colo. The Krucks are expecting their first baby in December, and, shortly thereafter, Jason will deploy to Afghanistan. Using technology to stay connected will be more important than ever during those months apart.

“Jason doesn’t want to miss anything,” said Sarah. “With the uncertainty that comes with deployment, it’s reassuring to know that he’ll be able to use his smartphone to see the baby growing, hear her first laugh and experience other milestones along the way. And the baby can interact with and get to know her father as much as possible so that the adjustment when he returns is a smooth one.”

Since the couple wed in 2008, Jason has attended numerous trainings and was deployed once, and the family has moved four times. During these times, Jason and Sarah have relied on video conferencing tools like FaceTime, Google Hangouts and Skype to stay connected. For the Krucks, like so many military families around the world, connecting through technology is essential.

Sometimes, however, military personnel like Jason may only have time for quick updates to friends and family. When time is limited or circumstances prove difficult, mobile apps like My Soldier App allow military personnel to share their status with friends and family.   

To help military families do more than just communicate, earlier this year the National Military Family Association launched its MyMilitaryLife app to guide spouses of military personnel through key events such as moving or deployment. The app provides valuable resources on everything from emergency contact information to personalized checklists for organizing and navigating these transitions.

Do you have a suggestion for a technology or app to keep in touch with someone in the military? Let us know on Twitter at @VZWChuck.