Other Wireless Topics

Find information about Verizon's community service, customer satisfaction, account protection, accessibility and other company initiatives.
Select Your Device
Apple® iPhone® 6
Samsung Galaxy S® 5
Samsung Galaxy S6 edge +
Samsung Galaxy Note5
Apple® iPhone® 6 Plus
Apple® iPhone® 5s
Samsung Galaxy S® 4
Samsung Galaxy S® 6
Apple® iPhone® 5c
DROID MAXX by MOTOROLA
Apple® iPad® 2
Samsung Galaxy Note® 4
Apple® iPhone® 5
Apple® iPhone® 4s
Samsung Convoy™ 3
Samsung Galaxy Core Prime™
Apple® iPhone® 4
Droid Turbo by Motorola
LG G3
Verizon Ellipsis™ 7
Droid Turbo in Ballistic Nylon
Samsung Galaxy S® III
Verizon Ellipsis™ Jetpack®
Samsung Galaxy Note® 3
Verizon Jetpack® 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot MiFi® 5510L
LG G2
Ellipsis™ 8
DROID RAZR M by MOTOROLA
Samsung Galaxy S® 6 edge
Samsung Network Extender
LG Cosmos™ 3
LG G4™
Jetpack® MiFi® 6620L
DROID MINI by MOTOROLA
Sony Xperia® Z3v
HTC One® (M8)
LG Revere® 3
DROID ULTRA by MOTOROLA
LG G Pad 8.3 LTE
Brigadier™ by Kyocera
LG Extravert™ 2
Pantech 4G LTE Global USB Modem UML290
Samsung Galaxy Note® II
Verizon Wireless Home Phone
Verizon 4G LTE Broadband Router with Voice
Casio G'zOne Commando® 4G LTE
Galaxy Note® Edge
Jetpack® 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot MiFi® 4510L
Samsung Gusto® 3
Nokia Lumia 928
LG G Vista
Samsung Galaxy S® 4 mini
Moto X™ by Motorola
Casio G'zOne Ravine® 2
Moto X™ (2nd Gen.)
HTC One®
DuraXV
LG Optimus Exceed™ 2
Casio G'zOne Commando®
Samsung Brightside™
Verizon Jetpack® 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot 890L
HTC One M9
Ellipsis™ Jetpack® MHS800L
Samsung Gusto® 2
Samsung Galaxy J1™ Prepaid
GizmoPal™
Moto G™ by Motorola
DROID DNA by HTC
DROID RAZR MAXX HD by MOTOROLA
G Pad™ 7.0 LTE
DROID RAZR by MOTOROLA
Nokia Lumia 822
DROID RAZR HD by MOTOROLA
Samsung Convoy™ 2
LG Exalt™
Verizon 4G LTE USB Modem UML295
Nexus 6
Samsung Intensity® II
Gear S®
Samsung Galaxy S® III mini
Lucid™3 by LG
Samsung Intensity® III
Nokia Lumia Icon
DROID RAZR MAXX by MOTOROLA
Verizon Jetpack® 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot MiFi® 4620LE
Transpyre™ Prepaid
LTE Internet (Installed)
Moto E™ Prepaid
Samsung Galaxy Tab® 4 (10.1)
BlackBerry® Bold™ 9930 smartphone
LG Optimus Zone™ 2 Prepaid
iPad® Air 2
Microsoft Lumia 735
LG Cosmos™ 2
Verizon Jetpack® 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot MHS291L
Samsung Illusion™
LG Octane™
Samsung Jetpack® 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot SCH-LC11
LG Revere®
Samsung Convoy™
DROID 4 by MOTOROLA
Verizon 4G LTE USB Modem 551L
LG Revere® 2
Verizon Jetpack® 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot MiFi® 4620L
Lucid™2 by LG
G Pad™ 10.1 LTE
Blackberry Classic
Samsung Gusto®
Lucid™ by LG
HTC One® remix
BlackBerry® Z10 smartphone
DROID Eris by HTC
LG enV®3
BlackBerry® Z30 smartphone
Samsung Galaxy Stellar™
HTC One® (M8) for Windows®
DROID BIONIC by MOTOROLA
HTC Desire® 612
Enact™ by LG
LG Cosmos™
Apple® iPad® Air™
Windows Phone 8X by HTC
HTC One® max
Verizon Wireless AirCard® 595
Galaxy Nexus by Samsung
Samsung Haven™
Apple® iPad® with Wi-Fi and MiFi® 2200 Hotspot
LG Accolade™
Hydro ELITE by KYOCERA
Samsung Galaxy™ Stratosphere™ II
Samsung Galaxy Tab® S
LG Extravert™
Samsung Galaxy Tab® 2 (7.0)
Apple® iPad® mini
DROID INCREDIBLE 2 by HTC
BlackBerry® Q10 smartphone
Samsung Galaxy Tab®
Verizon SureResponse®
Casio G'zOne Ravine®
Pantech Perception™
Samsung Galaxy Tab® 2 (10.1)
Samsung Galaxy Tab® 4 (8.0)
DROID INCREDIBLE 4G LTE by HTC
Samsung Galaxy Note® Pro
DROID X2 by MOTOROLA
iPad® mini 3
Moto X™ - Designed by You (2nd Generation)
Samsung Galaxy™ Stratosphere™
DROID X by MOTOROLA
Verizon MiFi™ 2200 Intelligent Mobile Hotspot - OTA
Lancet™
Samsung Intensity®
Samsung Knack™
Google Nexus 7
Pantech Jest™ 2
Spectrum™ 2 by LG
DROID 3 by MOTOROLA
BlackBerry® Bold 9650 smartphone
Luge™ by Motorola Prepaid
Samsung Galaxy Legend™
Motorola Barrage™
Pantech Hotshot™
LG 4G LTE USB Modem VL600
LG VX8300
Apple® iPad® with Wi-Fi + 4G
DROID by MOTOROLA
LG G Pad™ X8.3
LG Cosmos™ Touch
LG enV® TOUCH
THUNDERBOLT™ by HTC
Motorola MOTO™ W755
HTC Desire® 526
Apple® iPad® with Retina display
Samsung SCH-u340
LG Terra™
LG enV®2
Samsung ATIV SE™
Samsung Fascinate™
HTC Rezound™
Motorola RAZR V3m
Moto X™ - Designed by You
Verizon MiFi® 4G LTE Global USB Modem U620L
Apple® iPad® mini with Retina display
DROID CHARGE by SAMSUNG
Nokia 2366i
DROID INCREDIBLE by HTC
Samsung ATIV Odyssey™
Pantech Breakout™
Casio G'zOne Boulder®
Samsung Alias™ 2
Motorola XOOM™ 4G LTE
Delphi Connect with 4G LTE Mobile Hotspot
Verizon MiFi™2200 Intelligent Mobile Hotspot
Intuition™ by LG
LG Migosm
Pantech Marauder™
Verizon Wireless USB760 Modem
LG VX5500
Dell™ Vostro™ V13 Laptop
BlackBerry® Bold™ 9930 smartphone without camera
Samsung Galaxy Note® 10.1 2014 Edition
LG VX8360
Samsung Galaxy Tab® (10.1)
Samsung Smooth™
Samsung Galaxy Note® 10.1
HTC Rhyme™
LG Optimus Exceed™ Prepaid
LG VX5400
Nokia Lumia 2520
Casio G'zOne Rock™
Casio G'zOne Brigade®
LG Optimus Zone™
Samsung Alias™
DROID 2 GLOBAL by MOTOROLA
Sony Xperia® Z2
Verizon Wireless UMW190 Global USB Modem
DROID 2 by MOTOROLA
BlackBerry® Storm2™ 9550 smartphone Prepaid
Verizon Fivespot™ Global Ready™ 3G Mobile Hotspot
LG Vortex™
BlackBerry® Pearl™ Flip 8230 smartphone
Motorola W385
Samsung Reality™
Spectrum™ by LG
Pantech PN-215
Revolution™ by LG
Apple® iPad®
Pantech Crux™
Samsung Galaxy Tab® 4
BlackBerry® Tour™ 9630 smartphone
Verizon Wireless UM175 USB Modem
LG Ally™
LG Chocolate® Touch
Verizon Converged VOIP Device
BlackBerry® Curve™ 9330 smartphone
Samsung Galaxy Tab® (7.7)
Motorola RAZR V3m in Gray
LG Enlighten®
LG VX8350
Motorola MOTO™ VU204
DROID XYBOARD 8.2 by MOTOROLA
Casio G'zOne Ravine® 2 Non-Camera
Samsung SCH-u410
Delphi Connect
Verizon Wireless USB720 Modem
Motorola MOTOKRZR K1m
LG Dare™
Blackberry Classic Non-Camera
DROID PRO by MOTOROLA
Pantech Caper™ Prepaid
Motorola Adventure™ V750
BlackBerry® Curve™ 8530 smartphone
BlackBerry® Curve™ 8330 smartphone
BlackBerry® Torch™ 9850 smartphone
Sony Xperia® PLAY
Casio EXILIM
LG Voyager™
Verizon Wireless CDM8975
Verizon Wireless Escapade®
Pantech PN-210
Verizon Wireless G'zOne Type-S
Verizon Wireless Salute™
Samsung Juke
Verizon Wireless AirCard® 595U USB Modem
BlackBerry® Curve™ 9370 smartphone
Samsung SCH-u430
G'zOne Boulder™ Black and Silver
DROID XYBOARD 10.1 by MOTOROLA
Samsung Continuum™
LG enV®
HTC Trophy™
BlackBerry® 8830 World Edition smartphone
LG VX5300
Verizon Wireless UM150 USB Modem
Nokia 2705 Shade™ Non-Camera
LG VX5200
LG Chocolate®
Samsung Zeal™
Verizon Wireless PC5750 PC Card
Verizon Wireless USB727 Modem
Nokia 6015i Prepaid
Samsung Rogue™
Verizon Wireless Razzle™
HP® Mini 1151NR Netbook
Samsung SCH-u540
LG Chocolate® 3
Jest™
Samsung Galaxy Camera®
Motorola E815
Samsung SCH-a930
Motorola XOOM™
Lumia 2520 Prepaid
Motorola W315
Motorola Rival™
Motorola Entice™
LG VX8700
Motorola MOTO Q™ 9c
LG VX6100
Motorola V325i
Samsung Omnia® II
LG Clout™
Samsung SCH-a670
Motorola RAZR V3c
BlackBerry® Curve™ 9310 smartphone
LG Versa™
Motorola DEVOUR™ with MOTOBLUR™
Verizon Wireless Adamant™
Gateway® LT2016u Netbook
Motorola V325
LG VX8100
Samsung SCH-a650
HP® Pavilion dm1-3010nr Notebook
Samsung SCH-u550
Sharp KIN™ ONE
Motorola MOTO™ Z6c World Edition
LG VX3200
Sierra Wireless AirCard® 555D
Samsung Gleam®
Samsung SCH-a870
Motorola MOTO™ Z6cx World Edition without Camera
Sierra Wireless AirCard® 580
LG VX4500
Samsung Trance™
LG Fathom®
Kyocera KPC650
HP® Mini 311-1037NR Netbook
Nokia 7705 Twist™
Samsung N150 Netbook
Samsung Sway™
Samsung Gem™
DROID R2D2 by MOTOROLA
Motorola CITRUS™
LG VX3300
Motorola Krave™ ZN4
LG Glance™
Pantech PN-820
HTC Merge®
Samsung Glyde™
Nokia 7205 Intrigue™
Compaq® Mini CQ10-688nr Netbook
LG VX4650
LG VX6000
Samsung SCH-a950
Verizon Wireless G'zOne Type-S Push to Talk without Camera
Samsung FlipShot®
Verizon Wireless CDM8950
Samsung SCH-i760
Verizon Wireless PN-300
Nokia 6205
Samsung SCH-u620
Verizon Wireless PC770 2-in-1 Card and ExpressCard®
HTC® Ozone™ with TALKS™ for Verizon Wireless
Verizon Wireless V740 ExpressCard
Samsung i600 Smartphone
Nokia 6215i
BlackBerry® 7250
LG VX9400
Motorola V60s
Kyocera K323
HP® Mini 110-1046NR Netbook
Samsung Renown™
Kyocera KX414
HP® Pavilion dm1-2010nr Entertainment Notebook
Motorola MOTORAZR maxx Ve
Nokia 2705 Shade™
Motorola V276
Samsung i700 Pocket PC
Verizon Wireless Blitz® Prepaid
Verizon Wireless USB1000 Global USB Modem
Motorola Rapture™ VU30
Kyocera SE47
Samsung SCH-a310
Sharp KIN™ TWOm
LG V
HP® Mini 210-1076NR Netbook
Motorola V710
Sharp KIN™ ONEm
Motorola V120e
Samsung Omnia®
Motorola V65p
Verizon Wireless CDM 7075
Verizon AD3700 Global USB Modem
Nokia 6315i
Kyocera KX1v
Samsung SCH-a850
LG VENUS™
Motorola Q™
Nokia 2605 Mirage
Samsung SCH-a610
Samsung SCH-a990
Motorola MOTOSLVR L7C
Sharp KIN™ TWO
Motorola C333
Motorola V265
Nokia 3589i
Nokia 2285
Samsung SCH-a970
Verizon XU870 Global ExpressCard®
BlackBerry® 7750
Samsung SCH-a795
Verizon KPC680 ExpressCard®
Nokia 2128i
Samsung SCH-a530
Kyocera KX444
Nokia 6236i
LG VX4700
HTC Apache XV6700
Motorola MOTO Q™ music 9m
Motorola T720
Motorola MOTORIZR Z6tv
Kyocera KX2
Motorola V60p
HTC Touch Pro™
Motorola V276 Prepaid
Motorola V325xi
Samsung Saga™
Verizon Wireless V620
Kyocera K404
Nokia 6305i
Samsung SCH-a790
HP® Mini 110-3098NR Netbook
Verizon Wireless V640
Samsung SCH-i730
Verizon Wireless U630 PC Card
Samsung SCH-a630
Samsung SCH-n330
HTC Desire® 626
SCH-u410 Prepaid
Verizon 4G LTE Broadband Router
Kyocera DuraXV Plus
Verizon Wireless XV6600 without Camera
Motorola T300p
LG VX2000
Motorola C343
Motorola T730
Samsung SCH-a890
Samsung SCH-i830

Explanation of Video Optimization Deployment

[General Information]

Verizon Wireless deployed video optimization technology in parts of its 3G and 4G mobile broadband network. This network management technology is designed to transmit data more efficiently, ease capacity burdens on the network, primarily from video files, and improve the user experience with faster downloads and decreased Internet latency.

Given the increasing web traffic for downloading video files, video optimization in particular benefits both the user as well as the network by facilitating sustainable online video browsing. By downloading only the necessary amount of data, video optimization enhances the video download experience as well makes room for other users to enjoy higher browsing speeds. Although much effort is made to avoid changing the file during optimization, the process may minimally impact the appearance of the file as displayed on a device, though changes to the file are not likely to be noticeable.

The optimization techniques are applied to all content files coming from the Internet Port 80 that use the most common compression formats. The form and extent of optimization depends on the compression format of the content file, but does not depend on the content of the file, the originating web site, or the user's device. No distinction in the application of these techniques is made based on the source website or originator of the content. The system optimizes files based strictly on the type of file and the relevant file formats (recognizing that some file types are not modified). Accordingly, all content, including Verizon Wireless branded content, of the same type will be subject to the same process.

Why Optimization? Delivering content files requested by an end user over the Internet always imposes some burden on the delivery network in terms of size of the file as well as the distance the file components must travel between the source and end user. These factors also directly affect the user experience in downloading the file.

When the network uses techniques to "optimize" or streamline content files the burden on the network can be lessened and both the speed and efficiency of delivery to the end user can be improved. For example, the size of the file can be compressed by removing pieces of information that are not usable by the end user's mobile device, or that are not noticeable to the user. Caching the file for subsequent requests can also reduce the time needed for delivery to end users. Such network management techniques improve the user experience without noticeable impact on the content itself.

Guiding Principles of Congestion Triggered Video Optimization
. The goal of video optimization is to only optimize video files when necessary and to make intelligent tradeoffs that maximize the total quality of video to all users. The objective is to be proportionally fair as measured (or estimated) in total video quality viewed on the customers device. For example, video stalling is objectionable to the end user. Therefore, a standard resolution video that does not stall is perceived to have a higher total video quality score that that of a high definition video that does stall. An intelligent network decision that reduces the resolution of a video to prevent stalling is deemed to be a good tradeoff for customer satisfaction.

How Optimization Works. All HTTP (Port 80, i.e., World Wide Web) traffic is directed to the optimization process. The first step is to determine if the serving cell site is highly loaded, indicating that any new video flow is likely to be degraded and/or stall. If there is no potential congestion, then nothing is done and the video proceeds normally. If there is a potential for stalling, then the video optimization techniques are invoked. The direction of traffic to the optimization process is established when the user starts an HTTP data session before any requests for content from a specific web site have been made. Accordingly, content files are never selected for optimization based on the nature of the web content itself or the source or provider of the web content file. All web content files delivered over Port 80, regardless of source, are directed to the optimization process (assuming the cell site congestion criteria are met). The system captures all Verizon Wireless branded web content delivered from its web servers, and treats it the same way as content from non-Verizon Wireless sites.

Content files made available on the World Wide Web come in a variety of types (web pages, text, images and videos) and formats. The process uses several optimization techniques that depend on the specific type of content file. Specifically, text files are compressed without any loss of information ("lossless") and cached for subsequent end user requests. Image files (PNG, JPEG, and GIF formats, for example) are streamlined to remove colors or other data bits that would not be visible to the human eye, or to end users on a mobile device with limited display resolutions, thereby decreasing the size of the file, and are also cached. The output image file reflects "lossy" optimization because some data bits from the original file are lost in the optimization process.

Video Optimization. Video files represent a substantial and growing segment of web traffic, and also come in a variety of formats. Optimization only captures recorded video files and does not affect live streaming video, e.g., a video conference call. Several optimization techniques are applied to video files: transcoding, caching, transrating, buffer, and ABR tuning. All are agnostic as to the source or content of the video.

Transcoding. When preparing a video file for posting on a web site, the video originator must select a codec (compression/decompression format) for the file. All codecs are "lossy" to some degree in the compression process in that they reduce the quality of the original video. But, some codecs are more efficient than others. The Optimization transcodes video files from their source codecs to a more efficient codec, H.264. If the requesting device cannot decode an H.264 file, the file is delivered in the input codec. Also, if the input file codec is H.264, there will be little or no effect on the file from the processes described below.

The goal of this optimization process is to reduce the content file size while maintaining very similar video quality. Re-quantization levels, that is, the size of the output file, are defined by the output video bit rate settings (based on a percentage difference from the original). The loss of information from the input file may result in reduced color accuracy and sharpness of the output video. These effects are offset with optimized de-blocking and smoothing algorithms to retain good perceptual visual quality (as measured by objective video quality tools discussed below). In addition, videos are sent with variable bit rate (VBR), which provides more consistent quality at the same bit rate.

Optimization processes can range in how aggressively they pursue content file savings. Verizon Wireless is using the Video Quality Measurement (VQM) tool to set the amount of reduction in a video file size. VQM is a standardized method of objectively measuring video quality that closely predicts the subjective quality ratings that would be obtained from a panel of human viewers. Although the tool is free, the technology is covered by four U.S. patents owned by NTIA/ITS. The compression settings utilized equate to a .4-.6 score on the VQM scale, which is considered an "unnoticeable" change.

Transrating. This is similar to transcoding; however the source and destination codecs are kept in the same codec family. For example, the H.264 codec can have a higher input rate and be transrated to an H.264 codec with a lower delivery rate. The VQM treatment is similar to transcoding. Verizon Wireless selects the minimal amount of transrating to keep the overall video quality as high as possible while maintain the objective to not let the video stall. As H264 has become a prominent and commonly adopted industry wide codec, more instances of transrating exist over transcoding.

ABR Tuning. The newest high technology codecs automatically and continuously adjusts the video bit rate to match the estimated channel conditions. Adaptive Bit Rate (ABR) types of codecs performance can be improved by tuning the actual network conditions to the various codec rates supported for each video.

Caching. When a video file is detected from the Internet stream, the system decodes the first few frames (8 KB) of the video. Based on those frames, the system attempts to locate the video file in its video cache, and, if the file is not in the cache, it copies the video file, catalogs, optimizes and places it into the video cache. (The system needs to look at the first few frames for the cataloging process because the same video may come to the network from different sources and would have different URLs and headers; so, the header information is insufficient to identify multiple copies of the same video.) The caching process is the same regardless of the source or content of the video.

When a requested video is not in cache initially, the input video file is sent on to the requesting device. When the system finds the video in its cache, then the flow from the Internet stops and the video is replaced with the file from the cache. The video cache will retain the video until the staleness filter flushes it from the cache. The video cache has a finite volume so it will regularly flush unused video.

Buffer Tuning. The fourth video optimization technique is used in delivery to end users.  Whenever the video is requested, it is delivered on a "just in time" basis. That is, rather than the entire file being downloaded when requested, the video is downloaded on an as-needed basis. A sufficient amount of video would be delivered to fill the user's buffer to start viewing, and the remainder would be delivered as needed in time for the viewer to see it without interrupting the flow, calculating the video bit rate and the actual bandwidth available. This progressive download achieves significant network savings if the viewer chooses not to view the entire video, and it conserves data usage that would count toward the end users' data allowance, and may result in savings if the end user is on a pay-for-usage plan. As with caching, the buffer process is the same regardless of the source or content of the video.

These video optimization techniques generally reduce the time for a video to start and eliminate external network fluctuations that sometimes cause videos to stall. They also speed up the time for the video to pick up when jumping forward in the video. The cache responds to the video request much faster than a remote location. The end result is a much smoother video that starts faster. 

Beginning in 2011, to optimize our network, we managed data connection speeds for a small subset of customers - those who are in the top 5% of data users and have 3G devices on unlimited data plans - and only in places and at times when the network was experiencing high demand.  We discontinued this practice in June, 2015.

Still Have Questions?


Visit the Community Forums

Ask questions, or share your opinions on Verizon Wireless products and services.

Visit the Community

Talk to us on Twitter

Got something to ask us? We're happy to help.

Visit @VZWSupport

Connect with us on Facebook

Post a support question on our wall and get a response from a Verizon Expert.

Visit Verizon Wireless Facebook

Get Help at a Store

Attend a Workshop
Attend a free workshop in a store to get detailed and personal assistance from a Verizon expert.
Visit a Store