4 ways the Google Daydream View puts VR in families’ reach

It’s approachable, it’s affordable and it’s an overall strong entry point to virtual reality experiences.

 

Forget NASA space-flight simulators. Virtual Reality (VR) devices are making interactive, 3D immersion experiences possible for everyone. And getting started in VR only requires a smartphone and a headset.

An approachable and affordable entry point into VR is the Google Daydream View headset. The device uses your own smartphone alongside a comfortable headset and remote to deliver a virtual experience. Daydream View displays games, apps and virtual tours in 3D, with kid-friendly setup and durability.

Here are the 4 most valuable features of the Google Daydream View:

1. Ease of use: The Daydream View’s features grow with your child — literally. There’s an adjustable head strap to fit many different sizes, as well as comfort features like a soft case and an inner liner that Wired notes can be "removed and hand-washed" when needed.

Techcrunch finds the Daydream View "frictionless," with hassle-free setup. Once you “pop the phone into the headset … everything else is taken care of,” making VR easy to explore. Kids can operate the device as soon as they’re able (and trusted) to use a smartphone.

2. Expandability: Apps can be downloaded on demand directly to the smartphone. Depending on the app, your child can go from a “forest clearing with a waterfall” to “[throwing] sticks for a VR canine," Wired and The Verge note. Wired also praises the "flawlessly comfortable [in-app] experiences" with a "VR pipeline … robust and growing all the time."

Kids also can use the provided remote to interact with the Daydream View. Wired calls this tool “a laser pointer, an aiming reticle, a flashlight, a wand, or just about anything you need it to be.” With the VR headset and remote, kids can deepen their interactions within their favorite apps and games.

3. On-the-go features: The Daydream View can keep up with even the busiest kid. The Verge describes the device as “significantly smaller, lighter, and more portable” than other VR options. It's even “spot-cleanable” and “dirt-resistant,” which should come as a relief to parents.

Battery life is usually a challenge for families on the move. But users of the Daydream View can expect run time up to 12 hours, and the device can be recharged anywhere.

4. Entertainment options: Wired counts over 40 games, immersive experiences and apps available for the Daydream View. Favorites like Star Chart take an educational focus, and The Verge notes that many available apps “tie nicely into Google's educational program.” The Daydream View’s app library is ever-expanding.

Be sure to check out a complete parents' guide to kids and tech on Verizon's Family Tech page today.

 

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